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at the convergence of 50 research reports that talked about the dangers of cell phone use in testinand texting devicee driving. there was so little understanding about this. we had a massive debate. we knew this was very danger is behavior based on the research. we come from at traffic safety perspective, and we know the way to change this behavior follows the formula you heard ray lahood talk about. how you do that in the framework of very little conversation was the difficult part. a year ago on january we call for a nationwide ban on told a news and text to use while driving, and we called for companies to put in place policies prohibit the use of this. it was such a long debate press because of the lack of conversation. then i look at today and what we heard from secretary lahood and others. but that the amount of activity we have heard from a state legislative point of view, a research point of view, law enforcement point of view. i encourage you as we listen to our panelists today to think about how we maintain the momentum. i think all of us know that a year of action, even a tremendou
of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
? congratulations. you get the book. appreciate it. that's it for us. situation room with wolf blitzer next. >>> new evidence that the man trying to bomb times square in new york city didn't plan to stop there. this hour, we're learning more about the terror threats then and now including a potential plot to attack high-profile targets in europe. >>> also, the california governor's race gets combustible with new allegations leveled by a former housekeeper to republican candidate meg whitman. stand by for the story and brand new polls on some of the hottest political races in the nation. some will surpriseyou. our investigative correspondent will reveal how she was almost punked. political activist tried to create a fake story and embarrass cnn. wait until you hear and see these very strange details. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room". >>> threatened to be the most serious terror attacks since 9/11. now we're learning that he had over targets as well. a potential terror plot in europe that may have been green lighted by osama bin laden himself. let's bring in homeland security correspon
on for a time frame, even though the dispersant used was pre authorized, the issue that seemed to be elevated to a national response team in washington at some point, a decision was made that the epa should play a more active role, then call for. on may 20, and you advised bp to reduce the application of dispersant and provide the availability of less toxic dispersants. please help us understand your concerns and the process you went through in conjunction with the other federal agencies. the epa had more of a commanding role than anticipated than in the area contingency plan. is there some recommendation you can provide to us about what kind of guideline that we might recommend that would elevate the decision making to more routine decisions of these dispersants to these extraordinary kinds of decisions? >> thanks. i will probably end where you ended. there is a need for those kinds of guidelines. every day you make the decisions that are before you. over time, one of the things i discussed often is duke are not only looking at the decision before you that today, but also at the response. fr
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
our way. it is a good thing. we could use some rain. not a great thing, because it is a weekend. we will try to split the weekend 50/50. it is all coming up. >> thank you. today marks the 9 -- the ninth anniversary of the september a lot of terrorist attacks. >> there has been controversy of the planned islamic center near ground zero, and the plan burden of the koran. >> despite a heated debate over a proposed mosque and flans by a for the tester to burn copies of the koran, today, the focus returns to remembering the victims. ceremonies in new york, virginia, and pennsylvania pay tribute to the victims killed when terrorists hijacked four commercial planes. in lower manhattan, 9/11 families gather at the park adjacent to ground zero. the names of victims will be read throughout the morning. four moments of silence will mark the times each plane had, and each tower fell. vice-president joe biden is attending. at the pentagon, president obama participated in a wreath laying ceremony. in pennsylvania, were united flight 93 crash, first lady michelle obama and laura bullish attend a c
was there. many of us were there. it was an amazing night. she looked beautiful. we've got a bunch of pictures to show you coming up later. >>> also, we have some other news about our "gma" family today. our marysol castro is celebrating her last day here at "gma." i am not celebrating. i am very upset. about this. i will miss you making fun of me all the time. >> i'm going to miss making fun of you actually. >> you have my e-mail address. so you can continue to do so. >> it won't be at 3:00 in the morning. i will definitely sleep in on the weekends. >> the girl's getting a year's prescription to ambien. >> yes, exactly of the truth be told, wonderful wedding. i happen to on my last day at work forget to pack clothing, so, girl, this is your -- i broke into your dressing room. this is your dress. it fits like a glo i promise i'll bring it back toy >> a little secret. >>> coming up this morning, we're going to take a look back at several moments just like that during mary's s run here on "gma." >> also this morning, something you rarely see or hear and t tar iely see or hear and fro
morning, everybody. thanks for being with us. tropical storm hermine has broken up. but it is not done wreaking havoc. >> hermine's latest chaos, tornadoes around dallas. funnel clouds landed into buildings and power lines, casting off debris and electrical sparks. >> the rain is moving in a northeasterly direction, toward illinois. and it will continue to clobber the area with heavy flash flooding. brad wheelis has details. >> reporter: the water rose so quickly, emergency responders used whatever means necessary to get to people in need. >> i'm so thankful they were here to save us. my boyfriend told me to get on the roof. and i did. they put me in the vest and got me across. >> reporter: residents were trapped on roofs and balconies after flash floods turned roads into rivers. the remnants of tropical storm hermine, drenched dallas, austin and san antonio. 10 to 20 inches of rain fell in 24 hours. >> it's been very hard for the people that live here. and very scary for the family. >> reporter: cars were barely visible above the water. homes were islands. schools were evacuated. even
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
. this is governor sarah palin. vote for christine o'donnell for u.s. senate this tuesday. >> reporter: o'donnell is up against one of delaware's most popular political figures, congressman mike castle. republican leaders think he is their only chance of winning joe biden's old senate seat. >> if she were, by some miracle to be our nominee, we would lose this seat and lose it by unprecedented numbers. >> reporter: castle has won 11 strait-wide elections in heavily-democratic delaware. in part because he is a proportion rights, pro-gun control moderate, who works with democrats. that's exactly why tea party activists don't like him. >> the republican party has lost its way. they get behind candidates like my opponent, who don't even support the republican platform. who continue to support the democrats' agenda, lock, step and barrel. >> high-stakes. we're here at the smart screen to look at the state of the overall race. let's begin with the senate right now. the magic number for republicans in the senate. they now hold 41 senate seats. they need ten to take control. this is the universe o
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
for other candidates, there is though clear-cut winner. >> it is clear that people are supporting us. another message is for those working on our campaign and that is keep working hard. at the end of the day, the only poll that matters is the one taken and added and counted on september 14th and that is the vote that will make me the next mayor of the district of columbia. >> mayor feinty did not make himself available for an interview but his campaign that matter are nt saying the the count when the polls close on election day. we are out on doorsteps every day get getting our message out it as many voter as we can. the mayor is asking for the president's support in his race for re-election. the mayor told mr. obama the best choice for president. >>> maryland attorney general doug gansler is looking into the election controversy in prince george's continuey. he wants to find out more about fake sample ballots mailed and handed out over the weekend. today is the last day for early voting in maryland's upcoming gubernatorial primary. the early voting centers have been open since last
'll tell us how the administration is about to go with a prominent republican. let's begin with brianna keilar live in washington. congress is back in session for the big midterm election push and they've got a very big issue on their hands in the matter of whether or not to extend these bush tax cuts. this is -- this is going to be an interesting one to watch in the next couple of days. >> and this is the big issue, jim. this is the issue that in really less than four weeks because they're out of there again. they're out of washington again ahead of the election season, this is what they're going to be dealing with. and obviously, the issue that continues to resinate is republican leader john boehner who had said that he would go along with extending the tax cuts for everyone except for the wealthiest earns, which, of course, is what president obama has gone for. but it's created a jumbled message among republicans. because look at what some other republicans are saying. you have mitch mcconnell who is saying, no, i'm pushing legislation to keep these tax cuts in place across the board
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet -- here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
bowers is in portage, wisconsin to bring us up to date. good morning, cindy. >> reporter: good morning, maggie. this earthen he levee is part of a series of dikes built mostly sand way back in the 1890s. sunday parts began to erode or give way as people in the historic town of portage are seeing the wisconsin river at its highest level since 1938. here in portage, the wisconsin river reached 20.5 feet sunday. that's even higher than the predicted crest, which forecastrs said wouldn't come until later today. 300 residents were asked to evacuate but those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us that we have -- that we had ten minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all the roads back there. >> reporter: all this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to their homes only to find their belongings water-logged. >> phone calls from a few friends letting m
basara. >> and i'm stan stovall. thanks for joining us for 11 news today. >> meteorologist john collins has a check of the forecast. looking good. >> yeah. you mentioned the fall-like weekend. i was out working in the yard past couple of days, very nice, and a lot of leaves in the lawn. but it's not because of fall-like temperatures, it's because of the dry conditions we've got. >> but let's talk about the cool for the moment. we'll address the wet in just a minute, or dry, or whichever way you want to look at it. at b.w.i. marshall right now, 56 degrees the temperature. that's the low there so far this morning. it just dropped into that range. 72%, the humidity. barometer has bumped up just a little bit, and we have a breeze to the west at 6. we'll still have a breeze tonight, not as breezy as yesterday. cool temperatures dominate the great lakes, new england, right down into the midatlantic region, all the warmer stuff is well to our south and southwest. so again today, very nice. now, we'll address the rain situation coming up in just a few minutes with the insta-weather plus forecas
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
of a possible o copycat attack. she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, september 17th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good friday morning to you. still waking up there, i'm erica hill. good to have you with us. fog not guilty new york city. >> and right there, too. i'm harry smith. good morning, everybody. breaking news this morning, you'll never guess who showed up in a prison in peru. it was beth hole way trying to vis visit joran van der sleuth, face to face for about five minutes. >> of course natalie hole way's mom who disappeared in rememberu. >>> also people in new york talking about this not only people in new york affected but really unusual in the city yesterday. huge storms rolled through around rush hour. hail, powerful winds, there was a huge thunderstorm. sideways rains and a possible tornado. dave price joins us this morning in queens in forest hills, new york where the storm hit hardest with the latest this morning. talk about destruction, dave. >> you know, typically when weather like this hap
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
questions from us, insisting reporters are twisting her words. is she right or is she trying to play the victim? also jesse jackson, jr., facing ethics questions of his own. details on that tonight. >>> also, a home invasion that ended in the murder of a mom, her two daughters. the trial is ongoing and today new evidence and insight on an allege the motive. testimony so disturbing the sole survivor had to leave the courtroom. and later sanjay gupta continuing his series on disease detectives. a little girl's life hanging in the balance, so does a mom's. we'll show you how a team of disease detectives are racing to save their lives. >>> we begin with the republican senate candidate dodging questions and a democratic congressman kind of doing the same. first christine o'donnell from delaware continuing to avoid questions. she announced last night she wouldn't be talking to the national media, she did that on a national forum, sarah palin recommended she use, fox news. for days now, our reporter gary tuchman has been examining these old checks ms. o'donnell paid for what appeared to be
on whether to allow a company to sell genetically engineered salmon to u.s. consumers. if approved by the fda this would be the first ever genetically engineered animal allowed for human consumption. manuel gullegos joins us live with the implications. a big decision here. >> reporter: that's right. what the federal government is considering is whether genetically engineered salmon that grows twice as fast as wild salmon should be allowed to go to the public. this is salmon grown and harvested in captivity and many consumers feel it's not a good idea because they are scared of it. it is not just a fish story. you could soon be eating genetically engineered salmon. using growth hormone from chan oak salmon, it is claimed that these eggs can grow full market size fish in half the time as wild salmon. they say it is safe and will create jobs. >> we can bring an industry back to the united states and provide americans a safe and sustainable high-quality seafood. >> reporter: the food and drug administration agrees it is safe but is waiting for an advisory panel opinion before approving it for sal
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
is r-rbl -- are social issues. chris van hollen from the democratic side joins us to tell us about democratic strategy, 34 days and counting. thank you, dana perino. juliet: president obama hitting the campaign trail to rally the democratic base ahead of the mid terms, holding an event in the traditionally liberal city of madison, wisconsin, police estimates that more than 26,000 people showed up to see him at the university of wisconsin's campus, the president, echoing back to his mantra of the 2008 campaign, that's that voters need to show up. >> change is going to come! change is going to come for this generation! if we work for it. if we fight for it. if we believe in it. the biggest mistake we could make right now, it's to let disappointment or frustration lead to apathy and indifference. that is how the other side wins. juliet: president obama said the other side will lead to the same failed polices that got us here in the first place. he was joined at the rally by a number of democratic candidates, including wisconsin senator russ feingold, he's currently trailing his republ
of us are washing our hands. a study in the "usa today" found 85% of adults say they wash their hands in public restroom rooms. however, when it comes to the sexes, the study says only 77% of men wash compared with 93% of women. >>> it is 8 after the hour. ahead a health alert about peripheral artery disease. it can be deadly if you don't know the warning signs. in three minutes, what you need to look out for. and learn about free testing coming up later this week. >>> right now our ocuss on maryland's weather and traffic. here's howard. >> no fog this morning. that's good. a little cool to start but we are in for a good looking tuesday an here. we start the day with 60s and even 50s out in parts of western maryland by 9:00 in the 860s 860s. -- angie has the maryland tuesday traffic. >> that's right. sky 9 is hovering over the roads. a live look at conditions on 4 t 5 near the georgia avenue exit. right now we are watching congestion build on the outer loop. that's the right of the screen making your way from new hampshire avenue to this spot. we are lacking a plus five minutes and gr
is really making her presence felt in the state next to us here in texas. twisters touched down in and around the city of dallas. that's where the weather channel's julie martin is joining us from this morning. julie, good morning to you. what's the latest? >> well, good morning, matt. hermine made for a very wild weather day here in texas, from flash flooding to tornadoes. it really left its mark, and unfortunately, it is not finished just yet. i want to take you now to some images from the evening rush hour last night here in dallas, as twisters just started dropping out of the sky, as many as six funnels reported throughout the area. one of them slicing right through the heart of the city, hitting many buildings, bringing up water mains, and also knocking out power to thousands of people. one of the most impressive images, an 18-wheeler literally picked up, flipped 180 degrees with the driver inside, and slammed into the very building i am standing in front of. that driver, by the way, is doing all right this morning. but before all of that widespread flash flooding throughou
for the weather. >> cool stuff for us this morning, not quite as cool as yesterday morning, but you will need a light jacket at this hour. the barometric pressure at 31.5. we will start out with sunshine this morning. it should stay dry during the day with a high temperature of 82 degrees later on today. so slightly warmer during the day today than yesterday. when we come back, we will check hurricane igor and the seven-day forecast. for now, to the news desk. >> overnight bp engineers began the final plugging of the leak in the gulf of mexico spill. >> jay gray has the latest from louisiana. >> engineers were set to begin the final pressure test on the deep water well. after pouring cement, scientists want to make sure the seal will hold more than 1,100 pounds of pressure per square inch. crew members are confident it will. in the final hours, there has been a sense of pride. >> the fact that it had done so much damage. it is the fact that we were able to help solve and fix something that so many people wanted and needed fixed. >> sealing the well won't solve the problem so many living on th
. >> morning, robin. this is a max can landfall in this storm. but it's a u.s. problem. we'll show you pictures of galveston this morning, of the waves breaking in that area. all the way up the texas coast. well into texas, with the problems that will be texas flooding. here's a look at the rain. look at the yellow, the heaviest rain. p. and the center of circulation is west of corpus christi. let's show you why it's not going to go away quickly. four to eight inches of rain. a little south of dallas, as well. big-time texas flooding. watch hermine interact with this stalled front that's north. look at oklahoma, north texas, in the hill country here. we could have a good, solid area. 10, 12 inches of rain that just stays put. nothing is going to kick this out until about thursday. we'll go over all the weather patterns. and again, watching the tropics, active. there's a little wave off the coast of africa. gaston has weakened. not a lot to talk about. we'll watch them all. >>> we're going to go now to the wildfires in colorado. firefighters worked through the night, trying to contain them as th
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)